BVA joins “first time” medical voice on AMR

Reducing the use of antibiotics in animals is just one piece of the jigsaw when it comes to tackling antimicrobial resistance (AMR) says the British Veterinary Association (BVA), commenting as part of a “first time” coming together with the British Medical Association (BMA), Public Health England (PHE) and Veterinary Medicines Directorate (VMD).

The four bodies have joined forces to launch a “One Health” poster for use in doctors’ waiting rooms to ask patients if they are antibiotic aware.

The poster also highlights how the responsible use of antibiotics is necessary in both human and veterinary medicine to ensure the drugs’ continued effectiveness in treating illnesses.

“The UK veterinary profession is committed to the responsible use of antibiotics, and BVA supports all of the great work already being done by the profession to reduce the use of antibiotics across all species,” said Association president, Gudrun Ravetz (pictured above).

“However, reducing the use of antibiotics in animals is just one piece of the jigsaw when it comes to tackling AMR so we’re happy to be working with leading human medical organisations to ensure positive steps are taken across human and animal health to preserve these essential drugs for future generations.”

According to BVA’s Voice of the Veterinary Profession survey, AMR is a top three concern for vets, with almost half (49%) of vets listing it as the most pressing animal health and welfare issue.

Further BVA research shows that three out of five vets have seen clients who expect antibiotics to treat their pets and found there is still a lack of understanding about responsible antibiotic use with 70% of vets reporting poor owner compliance. BMA have also found nearly 6% of households have leftover antibiotics prescribed for humans, meaning patients had stopped their treatment early.

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